Company Press

ATTD Conference 

GWave non-invasive radio frequency-based glucose monitor starting clinical trials; aggregate data (n=53) demonstrates 96% readings in Zone A compared to venous glucose

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Dr. Irl Hirsch (University of Washington) presented a new dataset on the non-invasive GWave glucose monitor developed by Israel-based Hagar where Dr. Hirsch serves as a medical advisor.

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GWave by HAGAR to Present at Renowned Global Diabetes Conference

o showcase the results from its clinical studies as it seeks to break down barriers to glucose monitoring for millions of patients around the world.

Hagar showcases favorable GWave non-invasive blood glucose monitor data at ATTD following FDA breakthrough device designation

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Encouraging GWave non-invasive blood glucose monitor study results have been showcased at the ongoing Advanced Technologies and Treatments for Diabetes (ATTD) event...

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Tech on the Horizon: Updates on Glucose and Ketone Monitoring

Find out more from experts about the latest advancements in continuous glucose monitoring, ketone monitors, and non-invasive technologies.

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GWave by HAGAR to Present at Renowned Global Diabetes Conference

To showcase the results from its clinical studies as it seeks to break down barriers to glucose monitoring for millions of patients around the world.

Round B

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Hagar Lands Funding To Develop Noninvasive Glucose Monitoring Watch

Hagar is planning to put its GWave non-invasive continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology in a smartwatch and eventually sell the technology to a larger medtech player that can market it globally.

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Diabetes startup brews up $11M after 'serendipitous spill' led to creation of new CGM tech

Many of the most groundbreaking discoveries have happened accidentally: The microwave oven, for one, was developed after physicist Percy Spencer noticed a chocolate bar in his pocket had melted while he was experimenting with a magnetron. 

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HAGAR ,an Israel-based developer of GWave, a non-invasive glucose monitoring technology, raised $11.7 million in Series B funding led by
Columbia Pacific.

Hagar Brings in $11.7M for CGM Conceptualized from Tea Spill

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The financing follows $4.4 million the Tel Aviv, Israel-based company raised earlier this year.
Hagar has raised $11.7 million in a series B round to push forward GWave, a non-invasive continuous glucose monitoring technology, that originated from a spilled cup of tea.

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Hagar Raises $11.7M in Series B Funding

Hagar, a Tel Aviv, Israel-based developer non-invasive continuous glucose monitoring technology that uses RF waves to measure glucose levels in the blood, raised $11.7m in Series B funding.

HAGAR Secures $11.7M Series B Funding to Advance Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring Technology

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HAGAR, the developer of GWave, the world’s first non-invasive continuous glucose monitoring technology that uses RF waves to measure glucose levels in the blood, announced an $11.7 million Series B funding round led by a returning investor, Columbia Pacific. 

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Diabetes startups brew $ 11M after “accidental spills” lead to the creation of new CGM technology

Many of the most groundbreaking discoveries happened by accident. For example, the microwave oven was developed after physicist Percy Spencer noticed that the chocolate bar in his pocket had melted during a magnetron experiment. 

HAGAR raises $11.7m funding for non-invasive blood glucose monitoring technology

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GWave is claimed to be the world's first non-invasive continuous glucose monitoring technology that uses RF waves to measure glucose levels in the blood

Round A

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Wave of the Future: New Glucose Technology Could Revolutionize Care

For decades, researchers have sought to develop a noninvasive method to measure blood glucose levels, which – if effective – could revolutionize diabetes care. One company in Israel now has such a device in development.